Low Carb Crab Stuffed Bacon Cups Recipe

YUM!!!!  Low Carb Crab Stuffed Bacon Cups  Perfect for the Low Carbers!!!

Makes 12 standard or 24 minis Really good option for a meal, or as an appetizer!!

Low Carb Crab Stuffed Bacon Cups

Low Carb Crab Stuffed Bacon Cups

 

▶ INGREDIENTS:
1 lb Bacon
1 lb lump Crabmeat
1 block (8 oz) Cream cheese, softened
1 1/4 C Sharp Cheddar Cheese, grated
2 tsp Old bay
1 1/2 tsp mustard powder
1 stalk celery, very finely chopped



▶ DIRECTIONS:
Pre-heat oven to 425 degrees
Cut bacon in 1/3s for regular cupcake tins, or into 1/4 for minis
Lay bacon in tins, criss crossing, to cover the cup.
*note, I like to precook my bacon a wee bit to make it a little crisper, just cook until it is starting to turn, but is still soft enough to line the cups with.
In a small bowl add your crab, cream cheese, 1 C shredded cheddar cheese, old bay, mustard and celery.

If you try this  Low Carb Crab Stuffed Bacon Cups please let me know how you liked it!


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Skinny Cabbage Soup Recipe

This Skinny Cabbage Soup Recipe is a staple in my house. I make this soup at least once a month so I can “reboot” my body. It is a great detox soup that allows your body to shed a few extra pounds, dump some water weight and in general rev up your metabolism.

ENJOY!!!!

 

Skinny Cabbage Soup

Skinny Cabbage Soup

 Skinny Cabbage Soup Recipe:

Ingredients
1 head of cabbage, chopped
1 cup celery, diced
1 cup white or yellow onion, diced
1 cup carrots, diced
1 green bell pepper, diced
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
4 cups (or more) chicken broth
14 oz can basil, oregano, garlic diced tomatoes
1 teaspoon oregano
1 teaspoon basil
½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
few shakes of black pepper
½ teaspoon salt (optional)
Instructions
Instructions
Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large pot over medium heat.
Add celery, onions, bell peppers, and carrots.
Saute until slightly tender.
Stir in garlic.
Pour in chicken broth.
Stir in tomatoes and cabbage.
Bring to a boil and then reduce heat.
Cook until cabbage is tender.
Stir in oregano, basil, red pepper flakes, black pepper and salt (if using)
Taste broth and adjust seasoning if needed.
NOTE I add lots of seasoning to this, to make it my own. I also divided it up and in one pot I put in some pre-cooked chicken and the other some pre-cooked pork. I am all about getting that Protein because it is what fuels your body longer.

Broccoli Cauliflower Salad

Broccoli Cauliflower Salad

YUM! I like to make my own Ranch but otherwise THIS is a delicious salad! I think the sunflower seeds is my favorite part!
`•.¸¸.•´ •*.Feel Free to share this recipe with your friends ¸¸.•*´¯`
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Broccoli Cauliflower Salad

3 bunches of fresh Broccoli (enough to make a head)
1 head of cauliflower
Bacon bites
sunflower seeds
16 oz hidden valley lite ranch
red onion
Tomato
Colby Jack cheese cubed

Cut the broccoli and cauliflower into pieces, once you have completed with that, make sure you wash them well. Cut up part of a red onion, and cut the colby jack cheese into cubes. After you have washed your vegetables and cut the onion and cheese, place in large bowl all together, add the remainder ingredients (the entire 10 oz bottle of ranch, sunflower seeds, and bacon bites. Sunflower seeds, bacon bites, onion and cheese you, can use any desired amount). After all the ingredients have been added, mix all them together with a large spoon. Place in refrigerator and let chill for an hour then serve.

B12 deficiency: a silent epidemic with serious consequences

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I found this information here http://chriskresser.com/b12-deficiency-a-silent-epidemic-with-serious-consequences as soon as I was done reading it I KNEW I had to also make a blog about it, to help get the word out. I know many people who have MS and a few of the other conditions that are mentioned, really makes me wonder now if this could all be linked to a Deficiency of Vitamin B12. What are your thoughts? Leave a comment and let me know.

What do all of these diseases have in common?

Alzheimer’s, dementia, cognitive decline and memory loss (collectively referred to as “aging”)
Multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological disorders
Mental illness (depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, psychosis)
Cardiovascular disease
Learning or developmental disorders in kids
Autism spectrum disorder
Autoimmune disease and immune dysregulation
Cancer
Male and female infertility

Answer: they can all mimic the signs and symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency.

B12 deficiency: an invisible epidemic
B12 deficiency isn’t a bizarre, mysterious disease. It’s written about in every medical textbook and its causes and effects are well-established in the scientific literature.

However, B12 deficiency is far more common than most health care practitioners and the general public realize. Data from the Tufts University Framingham Offspring Study suggest that 40 percent of people between the ages of 26 and 83 have plasma B12 levels in the low normal range – a range at which many experience neurological symptoms. 9 percent had outright deficiency, and 16 percent exhibited “near deficiency”. Most surprising to the researchers was the fact that low B12 levels were as common in younger people as they were in the elderly.

That said, B12 deficiency has been estimated to affect about 40% of people over 60 years of age. It’s entirely possible that at least some of the symptoms we attribute to “normal” aging – such as memory loss, cognitive decline, decreased mobility, etc. – are at least in part caused by B12 deficiency.

Why is B12 deficiency so under-diagnosed?
B12 deficiency is often missed for two reasons. First, it’s not routinely tested by most physicians. Second, the low end of the laboratory reference range is too low. This is why most studies underestimate true levels of deficiency. Many B12 deficient people have so-called “normal” levels of B12.

Yet it is well-established in the scientific literature that people with B12 levels between 200 pg/mL and 350 pg/mL – levels considered “normal” in the U.S. – have clear B12 deficiency symptoms. Experts who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of B12 deficiency, like Sally Pacholok R.N. and Jeffery Stewart D.O., suggest treating all patients that are symptomatic and have B12 levels less than 450 pg/mL. They also recommend treating patients with normal B12, but elevated urinary methylmalonic acid (MMA), homocysteine and/or holotranscobalamin (other markers of B12 deficiency).

In Japan and Europe, the lower limit for B12 is between 500-550 pg/mL, the level associated with psychological and behavioral manifestations such as cognitive decline, dementia and memory loss. Some experts have speculated that the acceptance of higher levels as normal in Japan and the willingness to treat levels considered “normal” in the U.S. explain the low rates of Alzheimer’s and dementia in that country.

What is vitamin B12 and why do you need it?
Vitamin B12 works together with folate in the synthesis of DNA and red blood cells. It’s also involved in the production of the myelin sheath around the nerves, and the conduction of nerve impulses. You can think of the brain and the nervous system as a big tangle of wires. Myelin is the insulation that protects those wires and helps them to conduct messages.

Severe B12 deficiency in conditions like pernicious anemia (an autoimmune condition where the body destroys intrinsic factor, a protein necessary for the absorption of B12) used to be fatal until scientists figured out death could be prevented by feeding patients raw liver (which contains high amounts of B12). But anemia is the final stage of B12 deficiency. Long before anemia sets in, B12 deficiency causes several other problems, including fatigue, lethargy, weakness, memory loss and neurological and psychiatric problems.

B12 deficiency occurs in four stages, beginning with declining blood levels of the vitamin (stage I), progressing to low cellular concentrations of the vitamin (stage II), an increased blood level of homocysteine and a decreased rate of DNA synthesis (stage III), and finally, macrocytic anemia (stage IV).

Why is B12 deficiency so common?
The absorption of B12 is complex and involves several steps – each of which can go wrong. Causes of B12 malabsorption include:

intestinal dysbiosis
leaky gut and/or gut inflammation
atrophic gastrits or hypochlorhydria (low stomach acid)
pernicious anemia (autoimmune condition)
medications (especially PPIs and other acid-suppressing drugs)
alcohol
exposure to nitrous oxide (during surgery or recreational use)
This explains why B12 deficiency can occur even in people eating large amounts of B12-containing animal products. In fact, many of my patients that are B12 deficient are following a Paleo diet where they eat meat 2-3 times a day.

In general, the following groups are at greatest risk for B12 deficiency:

vegetarians and vegans
people aged 60 or over
people who regularly use PPIs or acid suppressing drugs
people on diabetes drugs like metformin
people with Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac or IBS
women with a history of infertility and miscarriage
Note to vegetarians and vegans: B12 is found ONLY in animal products
B12 is the only vitamin that contains a trace element (cobalt), which is why it’s called cobalamin. Cobalamin is produced in the gut of animals. It’s the only vitamin we can’t obtain from plants or sunlight. Plants don’t need B12 so they don’t store it.

A common myth amongst vegetarians and vegans is that it’s possible to get B12 from plant sources like seaweed, fermented soy, spirulina and brewers yeast. But plant foods said to contain B12 actually contain B12 analogs called cobamides that block intake of and increase the need for true B12.

This explains why studies consistently demonstrate that up to 50% of long-term vegetarians and 80% of vegans are deficient in B12.

The effects of B12 deficiency on kids are especially alarming. Studies have shown that kids raised until age 6 on a vegan diet are still B12 deficient even years after they start eating at least some animal products. In one study, the researchers found:

…a significant association between cobalamin [b12] status and performance on tests measuring fluid intelligence, spatial ability and short-term memory” with formerly vegan kids scoring lower than omnivorous kids in each case.

The deficit in fluid intelligence is particularly troubling, the researchers said, because:

…it involves reasoning, the capacity to solve complex problems, abstract thinking ability and the ability to learn. Any defect in this area may have far-reaching consequences for individual functioning.

I recognize that there are many reasons why people choose to eat the way they do, and I respect people’s right to make their own choices. I also know that, like all parents, vegetarians and vegans want the best for their children. This is why it’s absolutely crucial for those that abstain from animal products to understand that there are no plant sources of B12 and that all vegans and most vegetarians should supplement with B12. This is especially important for vegetarian or vegan children or pregnant women, whose need for B12 is even greater than adults.

Treatment of B12 deficiency
One of the greatest tragedies of the B12 epidemic is that diagnosis and treatment is relatively easy and cheap – especially when compared to treatment of the diseases B12 deficiency can cause. A B12 test can be performed by any laboratory, and should be covered by insurance. If you don’t have insurance, you can order it yourself from a lab like DirectLabs.com for $60.

As always, adequate treatment depends on the underlying mechanism causing the problem. People with pernicious anemia or inflammatory gut disorders like Crohn’s disease are likely to have impaired absorption for their entire lives, and will likely require B12 injections indefinitely. This may also be true for those with severe B12 deficiency causing neurological symptoms.

Some recent studies have suggested that high dose oral or nasal administration may be as effective as injections for those with B12 malabsorption problems. However, most B12 experts still recommend injections for people with pernicious anemia and advanced B12 deficiency involving neurological symptoms.

Cyanaocobalamin is the most frequently used form of B12 supplementation in the US. But recent evidence suggests that hydroxycobalamin (frequently used in Europe) is superior to cyanocobalamin, and methylcobalamin may be superior to both – especially for neurological disease.

Japanese studies indicate that methylcobalamin is even more effective in treating the neurological sequelae of B12 deficiency, and that it may be better absorbed because it bypasses several potential problems in the B12 absorption cycle. On top of that, methylcobalamin provides the body with methyl groups that play an role in various biological processes important to overall health.

If you suspect you have B12 deficiency, the first step is to get tested. You need an accurate baseline to work from. If you are B12 deficient, the next step is to identify the mechanism causing the deficiency. This is something you’ll probably need help with from a medical practitioner. Once the mechanism is identified, the appropriate form (injection, oral, sublingual or nasal) of supplementation, the dose and the length of treatment can be selected.

So, next time you or someone you know is “having a senior moment”, remember: it might not be “just aging”. It could be B12 deficiency.

Lavender Lemonade

This is just pretty. And I would drink it up! Now I want to grow some lavender again!

Lavender Lemonade
Yield: 8 servings
Recipe adapted from Centsational Girl & Joy the Baker

INGREDIENTS

2 cups water
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 cup agave nectar (or honey)
3 Tbsp dried lavender
2 cups freshly squeezed lemon juice
4 cups water
1 lemon, sliced (for garnish)

INSTRUCTIONS
http://www.eat-yourself-skinny.com/2012/09/lavender-lemonade.html

Photo: eat-yourself-skinny.com

Please feel free to leave me a comment and tell me what you think of this recipe, I love hearing feedback 🙂

Have a great day!

Steak Fajitas with Peppers, Onions, Black Beans and Salsa

Click The Picture to see the recipe 🙂 ENJOY!

And as always please feel free to leave me a comment, I love getting Feedback!

A Technique for Dissolving Stones in the Kidneys and Gallbladder Naturally

A Technique for Dissolving Stones in the Kidneys and Gallbladder

A Technique for Dissolving Stones in the Kidneys and Gallbladder

 

I have a nephew in-law who is in his mid 40’s, he has had over a 100 kidney stones since he was 17 years old. I sure hope this recipe can help someone out there from going through his pain and agony!

A Technique for Dissolving Stones in the Kidneys and Gallbladder
Stones in the kidneys or gallbladder can cause individuals pain. These stones are often caused by foods and water. This recipe below has been proven to work to help to dissolve stones from the body for those that are suffering from kidney and gallstones.
Ingredients:
• 9 ounces brown sugar
• 9 ounces extra virgin olive oil
• 9 ounces lemon with peel
• 9 ounces of parsley root that has been ground
• 9 ounces of raw honey
Wash the lemon well, then cut into small pieces and blend it well. Peel the parsley root, cut into small pieces and grind well. Place rest of the ingredients into the blender and blend well. Once well blended, the mixture should look even. Store mixture in the refrigerator in a glass bottle.
Individuals should take one tablespoon in the morning on an empty stomach. Repeat again before going to bed. Drink plenty of water when consuming this magic recipe. The recipe has a good taste to it, and can be used by anyone who suffers from stones in one of the organs.
Source: http://www.healthyfoodplace.com/

If you liked this information please feel free to leave a comment or send me a message. I love to get Feedback!

Officials Declare ‘Eating Healthy’ A Mental Disorder

Jeffery Jaxen, Natural Society ( http://naturalsociety.com/officials-declare-eating-healthy-mental-disorder/ )

In an attempt to curb the mass rush for food change and reform, psychiatry has green lighted a public relations push to spread awareness about their new buzzword “orthorexia nervosa,” defined as “a pathological obsession for biologically pure and healthy nutrition.” In other words, experts are moving toward saying that our demand for nutrient-dense, healthful food is a mental disorder that must be treated.

CNN, Fast Company, Popular Science, and other top outlets have all began to trumpet the talking points on cue relatively recently:

“Orthorexia nervosa is a label designated to those who are concerned about eating healthy. Characterized by disordered eating fueled by a desire for “clean” or “healthy” foods, those diagnosed with the condition are overly pre-occupied with the nutritional makeup of what they eat”.
In short, if you turn your back on low quality, corporate food containing known cancer causing toxic additives and a rich history of dishonesty rooted in a continuous “profits over people” modus operandi, then you may suffer from a mental illness. The cherry on top is that if you have the pseudo-science labeled disorder of orthorexia nervosa, you will be prescribed known toxic, pharmaceutical drugs from some of the same conglomerate corporations that you are trying to avoid by eating healthy in the first place.

Orthorexia has not yet found its way into the latest edition of the psychiatric bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), yet is commonly being lumped in with other eating disorders. Stepping back and looking at the ones pushing this label on us shows highly questionable motives.

Psychiatry as a whole is deeply in bed with a pharmaceutical industry that makes the drugs to “treat” every one of these “disorders.” It is often these companies that are wielding influence behind the scenes to invent more mental health categories with their toxic products as the answer. This latest media push to popularize orthorexia as a mental disorder with a goal to marginalize or derail the food revolution appears to have been dead on arrival.

The psychiatric community has even deemed creativity to be a mental illness.

As the people continue to walk away from the broken medical and agricultural/food systems like any abusive relationship, the food makers are willing to do anything to maintain their waning control. Organic and non-GMO food markets have exploded in the last 5 years, so much so that any corporation wishing to not follow the trend risks financial hardship or ruin. In addition, pharmaceutical companies are feeling the strain as less people want their toxic medications and crippling side effects.

Perhaps some individuals do take it too far to the point of self-harm, but the problem we face with a toxic food system is a much larger threat. In closing, let’s be aware of some of the overall BS fed to us by the pharmaceutical bankrolled industry of psychiatry. When healthy eating and creativity are mental issues, something is amiss.

Additional Sources:
http://www.popsci.com/striving-perfect-diet-making-us-sick

https://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/category/psychiatry-fraud/

Vitamin D and your Genetic make-up

Vitamin D

When looking at our genetic make-up, there are some people who have a CYP27B1 gene mutation which affects how your body uptakes Vitamin D. The Vitamin D deficiency shows in the genetic breaks of VDDR1 and VDDR2. FYI: If you have one or both of these genetic breaks, science has found that the intake of caffeine will block the body’s ability to absorb Vitamin D due to these mutations.
“VDDR1 and VDDR2 are characterized by low levels of the minerals calcium (hypocalcemia) and phosphate (hypophosphatemia), which are essential for the normal formation of bones and teeth. Affected individuals also have high levels of a hormone involved in regulating calcium levels called parathyroid hormone (PTH), which leads to a condition called secondary hyperparathyroidism. The two forms of vitamin D-dependent rickets can be distinguished by blood levels of a hormone called calcitriol, which is the active form of vitamin D; individuals with VDDR1 have abnormally low levels of calcitriol and individuals with VDDR2 have abnormally high levels.
Hair loss (alopecia) can occur in VDDR2, although not everyone with this form of the condition has alopecia. Affected individuals can have sparse or patchy hair or no hair at all on their heads. Some affected individuals are missing body hair as well.
CYP27B1 gene mutations cause VDDR1, and VDR gene mutations cause VDDR2. Both genes are involved in the body’s response to vitamin D, an important vitamin that can be can be acquired from foods in the diet or made by the body with the help of sunlight. Vitamin D helps maintain the proper balance of several minerals in the body, including calcium and phosphate. One of vitamin D’s major roles is to control the absorption of calcium and phosphate from the intestines into the bloodstream.
The CYP27B1 gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called 1-alpha-hydroxylase (1α-hydroxylase). This enzyme carries out the final reaction to convert vitamin D to its active form, calcitriol. Once converted, calcitriol attaches (binds) to a protein called vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is produced from the VDR gene. The resulting calcitriol-VDR complex then binds to particular regions of DNA and regulates the activity of vitamin D-responsive genes. By turning these genes on or off, VDR helps control the absorption of calcium and phosphate and other processes that regulate calcium levels in the body. VDR is also involved in hair growth through a process that does not require calcitriol binding.
Mutations in either of these genes prevent the body from responding to vitamin D. CYP27B1 gene mutations reduce or eliminate 1α-hydroxylase activity, which means vitamin D is not converted to its active form. The absence of calcitriol means vitamin D-responsive genes are not turned on (activated). VDR gene mutations alter the vitamin D receptor so that it cannot regulate gene activity, regardless of the presence of calcitriol in the body; often the altered receptor cannot interact with calcitriol or with DNA.
Without activation of vitamin D-responsive genes, absorption of calcium and phosphate falls, leading to hypocalcemia and hypophosphatemia. The lack of calcium and phosphate slows the deposition of these minerals in developing bones (bone mineralization), which leads to soft, weak bones and other features of vitamin D-dependent rickets. Low levels of calcium stimulate production of PTH, resulting in secondary hyperparathyroidism; hypocalcemia can also cause muscle weakness and seizures in individuals with vitamin D-dependent rickets. Certain abnormalities in the VDR protein also impair hair growth, causing alopecia in some people with VDDR2.” Source: Genetic Home Reference

Crockpot Gingered Chickpea and Spicy Tomato Stew Recipe

Crockpot Gingered Chickpea and Spicy Tomato Stew Recipe

Crockpot Gingered Chickpea and Spicy Tomato Stew

Crockpot Gingered Chickpea and Spicy Tomato Stew

Recipe and Photo Credit: http://www.cookincanuck.com
Author: Dara Michalski | Cookin’ Canuck
Serves: Serves 6
Ingredients

1 tbsp olive oil
2 onions, finely chopped
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 tbsp minced fresh ginger
2 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp coriander seeds
1 tsp salt
½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 tsp balsamic vinegar
2 cups coarsely chopped tomatoes, canned or fresh
2 cans (15 oz each) chickpeas, rinsed & drained, or 2 cups dried chickpeas, cooked & drained
2 cups (packed) fresh spinach leaves

Instructions

Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onions and cook, stirring, until the onions begin to brown.
Add garlic cloves, ginger, ground coriander, coriander seeds, salt, and pepper. Cook, stirring, for 1 minute.
Add balsamic vinegar and tomatoes. Bring the mixture to a boil.
Spread the chickpeas in the bottom of a crockpot (slow cooker). Pour the tomato mixture over the chickpeas and stir well.
Cover the crockpot and cook on Low for 6 to 8 hours or on High for 3 to 4 hours.
Just before serving, stir in spinach. You could use any leafy green that appeals to you, such as Swiss chard or kale.
Serve as a side dish or over rice as an entrée.

Notes
Weight Watchers Points: 6 (Points+), 5 (Old Points)
Nutrition Information
Serving size: ⅙ of stew Calories: 248.6 cal | Fat: 6.3g | Saturated fat: 0.8g | Carbohydrates: 41.2g | Sugar: 5.1g | Sodium: 917.7mg | Fiber: 8.3g | Protein: 8.7g | Cholesterol: 0mg

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